because tomblr was taken.

Jun 28 2012
King Sancho I of Castille began his reign in 1060 alongside his brothers Alfonse and Alonzo, the Kings of Galicia and Léon, respectively. Theirs is a time of petty squabbles among the lords of proto-Spain, doomed to a life of slap and riposte against one another as the Mohammedans continue to push their domains north, slowly absorbing Galicia, Toledo and Léon.
Sancho, earning the title Ironside among his peers for his siege work in the (failed) crusades to reclaim southern Spain, has thus far proved himself to be a man of opportunity. With three sons—Fadrique, Benjamin, and Silas—his succession was secured, and he had ample time to press thede jure claims of his fathers and snap up counties from Léon and Navarra to better strengthen great Castille, the core of Christendom in this besieged Spain.
Now in his late 50s, Sancho is tired from many years spent crushing revolt from the counts and barons on the periphery of the kingdom. A just man, but merciless, he has put many rebellious lords to the axe to be made example of, as his vassals are too ambitious for their own good.
As he trudges through the winter of his kingship, he prays that Fadrique, who stands to inherit all of his titles and holdings, will prove a stronger king than his weak, craven, and gluttonous personality have suggested. 

King Sancho I of Castille began his reign in 1060 alongside his brothers Alfonse and Alonzo, the Kings of Galicia and Léon, respectively. Theirs is a time of petty squabbles among the lords of proto-Spain, doomed to a life of slap and riposte against one another as the Mohammedans continue to push their domains north, slowly absorbing Galicia, Toledo and Léon.

Sancho, earning the title Ironside among his peers for his siege work in the (failed) crusades to reclaim southern Spain, has thus far proved himself to be a man of opportunity. With three sons—Fadrique, Benjamin, and Silas—his succession was secured, and he had ample time to press thede jure claims of his fathers and snap up counties from Léon and Navarra to better strengthen great Castille, the core of Christendom in this besieged Spain.

Now in his late 50s, Sancho is tired from many years spent crushing revolt from the counts and barons on the periphery of the kingdom. A just man, but merciless, he has put many rebellious lords to the axe to be made example of, as his vassals are too ambitious for their own good.

As he trudges through the winter of his kingship, he prays that Fadrique, who stands to inherit all of his titles and holdings, will prove a stronger king than his weak, craven, and gluttonous personality have suggested. 

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