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Jun 26 2012
Alas!
So ends the dynasty of the de Mandevilles of Essex and Somerset, when Thomas I was sabotaged by his deranged sister-in-law Matilda and his carriage careened off a cliff. Matilda’s young son, Arnold, stood to inherit the Duchy, including the counties of Somerset, Exsex, and Winchester, but the young Duke and his traitorous regent mother were no match for the hungry vultures of England, who picked them apart and left nothing but bones after two short, bitter months.
Nearly 100 years ago Geoffrey de Mandeville of Essex began his campaign, and through years of toil and fawning he gained the affection of the Great King Henry II, who oversaw an English Empire from Scotland to Castille! Henry agreed to take his young son David as his ward, and taught him the ways of the English Knights.
When Geoffrey died of the pox and David inherited at the age of 17, Pope Alexander III called his great Crusade for Egypt, and David fought valiantly in holy lands of the Levant for seven long years, leaving behind his new wife, yet childless. Upon their triumphant return, King Henry rewarded David’s bravery with the Duchy of Somerset, throwing the dynasty to heights undreamed of. 
Sadly, the lust for the holy land would not be dimmed, and David met his end in Jerusalem 11 years later, leaving his wife Alexandra and infant son, Daniel, to oversee the new lands. Perhaps as compensation, Henry II, now very old and weary with the burden of such a great empire, gave the young Duke Daniel the county of Dorset as well, and took him to court in London to bring him up as he had the boy’s father.
Daniel grew to surpass his father in nearly every way. Spending his youth suppressing the many revolts in the king’s French holdings, Daniel was baptised in steel and fire. He defended the isle of Albion from numerous invaders, standing at the side of the Henry II the Great, and then of his son, Nicholas I of England.
Though Daniel was loved throughout the Dukedom and had great friends at Nicholas’ court, his son Thomas would not take to warfare, nor to the scholarly life. He was married to a wealthy countess, Maud of Nantes, and left his father’s court to dwell with her. He served as her chancellor, Marshal, and Steward, and failed to show even a glimmer of competence in any of the posts. The countess of Nantes was enticed into rebellion by the lords of Brittany and Normandy, and though Daniel urged Thomas to dissuade her, he failed again, and there was a great war in the Channel and on the southern shores of once-bright Albion.
Though the war was won by the English and Daniel, the beginning of the end had arrived. Daniel, now in his fifties, caught the pox while leading a siege in Normandy. Though Thomas received the forgiveness and blessing of Nicholas the king, his wife, marked a traitor, was executed with the other rebellious nobles. Daniel left the dynasty and the thriving Duchy in the hands of a nervous, ill-prepared, and spiteful Thomas.
Thomas quickly arranged a marriage for himself to the widowed Duchess of Norfolk, though in three years they failed to produce an heir. Soon after Thomas took the Duke’s seat in Somerset, the Duke of Oxford brought his claim before Nicholas’ son, the new king Geoffrey, who declared it valid. A bitter war ensued, and many of Thomas’ vassals met their deaths by old Sarum, among the oldest ghosts that England knew. Dorset was taken, and Thomas flew into a petulant rage, driving nobles from his court, threatening servants with death and imprisonment. He saw daggers in every cloak and death in every shadow. After three sad years, he met his end as was first described, and with him ended the line of Geoffrey, David, and Daniel, the great Warrior Dukes of Essex and Somerset.

Alas!

So ends the dynasty of the de Mandevilles of Essex and Somerset, when Thomas I was sabotaged by his deranged sister-in-law Matilda and his carriage careened off a cliff. Matilda’s young son, Arnold, stood to inherit the Duchy, including the counties of Somerset, Exsex, and Winchester, but the young Duke and his traitorous regent mother were no match for the hungry vultures of England, who picked them apart and left nothing but bones after two short, bitter months.

Nearly 100 years ago Geoffrey de Mandeville of Essex began his campaign, and through years of toil and fawning he gained the affection of the Great King Henry II, who oversaw an English Empire from Scotland to Castille! Henry agreed to take his young son David as his ward, and taught him the ways of the English Knights.

When Geoffrey died of the pox and David inherited at the age of 17, Pope Alexander III called his great Crusade for Egypt, and David fought valiantly in holy lands of the Levant for seven long years, leaving behind his new wife, yet childless. Upon their triumphant return, King Henry rewarded David’s bravery with the Duchy of Somerset, throwing the dynasty to heights undreamed of. 

Sadly, the lust for the holy land would not be dimmed, and David met his end in Jerusalem 11 years later, leaving his wife Alexandra and infant son, Daniel, to oversee the new lands. Perhaps as compensation, Henry II, now very old and weary with the burden of such a great empire, gave the young Duke Daniel the county of Dorset as well, and took him to court in London to bring him up as he had the boy’s father.

Daniel grew to surpass his father in nearly every way. Spending his youth suppressing the many revolts in the king’s French holdings, Daniel was baptised in steel and fire. He defended the isle of Albion from numerous invaders, standing at the side of the Henry II the Great, and then of his son, Nicholas I of England.

Though Daniel was loved throughout the Dukedom and had great friends at Nicholas’ court, his son Thomas would not take to warfare, nor to the scholarly life. He was married to a wealthy countess, Maud of Nantes, and left his father’s court to dwell with her. He served as her chancellor, Marshal, and Steward, and failed to show even a glimmer of competence in any of the posts. The countess of Nantes was enticed into rebellion by the lords of Brittany and Normandy, and though Daniel urged Thomas to dissuade her, he failed again, and there was a great war in the Channel and on the southern shores of once-bright Albion.

Though the war was won by the English and Daniel, the beginning of the end had arrived. Daniel, now in his fifties, caught the pox while leading a siege in Normandy. Though Thomas received the forgiveness and blessing of Nicholas the king, his wife, marked a traitor, was executed with the other rebellious nobles. Daniel left the dynasty and the thriving Duchy in the hands of a nervous, ill-prepared, and spiteful Thomas.

Thomas quickly arranged a marriage for himself to the widowed Duchess of Norfolk, though in three years they failed to produce an heir. Soon after Thomas took the Duke’s seat in Somerset, the Duke of Oxford brought his claim before Nicholas’ son, the new king Geoffrey, who declared it valid. A bitter war ensued, and many of Thomas’ vassals met their deaths by old Sarum, among the oldest ghosts that England knew. Dorset was taken, and Thomas flew into a petulant rage, driving nobles from his court, threatening servants with death and imprisonment. He saw daggers in every cloak and death in every shadow. After three sad years, he met his end as was first described, and with him ended the line of Geoffrey, David, and Daniel, the great Warrior Dukes of Essex and Somerset.

44 notes

  1. finnollo reblogged this from tomippen
  2. thefuriousattic reblogged this from tomippen and added:
    an epic tale indeed!
  3. andalite25 reblogged this from tomippen and added:
    God I need you to narrate my dynasties rise and fall
  4. girlythingsforgeekypeople reblogged this from bythegods and added:
    So, uh, I just heard about this game and I’ve been drooling for five minutes straight. Holy cow. Anybody tried this?
  5. sirlowkey reblogged this from bythegods
  6. imkevinpham reblogged this from bythegods
  7. notperfectstillgood reblogged this from bythegods
  8. awushwush reblogged this from bythegods and added:
    I love this game!
  9. bythegods reblogged this from tomippen and added:
    Alright guys, so this is Crusader Kings 2, a game that any medieval-buffs will go absolutely ba-nay-nay for. Seriously,...
  10. simonf said: WHAT IS DEAD may never die.
  11. tomippen posted this
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